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The Culture of Control

Author: David Garland

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226190174

Category: Social Science

Page: 336

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The past 30 years have seen vast changes in our attitudes toward crime. More and more of us live in gated communities; prison populations have skyrocketed; and issues such as racial profiling, community policing, and "zero-tolerance" policies dominate the headlines. How is it that our response to crime and our sense of criminal justice has come to be so dramatically reconfigured? David Garland charts the changes in crime and criminal justice in America and Britain over the past twenty-five years, showing how they have been shaped by two underlying social forces: the distinctive social organization of late modernity and the neoconservative politics that came to dominate the United States and the United Kingdom in the 1980s. Garland explains how the new policies of crime and punishment, welfare and security—and the changing class, race, and gender relations that underpin them—are linked to the fundamental problems of governing contemporary societies, as states, corporations, and private citizens grapple with a volatile economy and a culture that combines expanded personal freedom with relaxed social controls. It is the risky, unfixed character of modern life that underlies our accelerating concern with control and crime control in particular. It is not just crime that has changed; society has changed as well, and this transformation has reshaped criminological thought, public policy, and the cultural meaning of crime and criminals. David Garland's The Culture of Control offers a brilliant guide to this process and its still-reverberating consequences.
The Culture of Control
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: David Garland
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-07-16 - Publisher: University of Chicago Press

The past 30 years have seen vast changes in our attitudes toward crime. More and more of us live in gated communities; prison populations have skyrocketed; and issues such as racial profiling, community policing, and "zero-tolerance" policies dominate the headlines. How is it that our response to crime and our
Managing Modernity
Language: en
Pages: 206
Authors: Matt Matravers
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-09-13 - Publisher: Routledge

In the last thirty years, the USA and the UK have witnessed a profound change in the way in which we think about and respond to crime and social control. Crime has become part of everyday life as, for many citizens, has imprisonment. Managing Modernity brings together criminologists, social theorists,
The Culture of Control
Language: en
Pages: 307
Authors: David Garland
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2001-03-29 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

This work charts the changes in crime control & criminal justice that have occurred in Britain & America over the last 25 years. It then explains these transformations by showing how social organisation has prompted political and cultural adaptations.
Edited Clean Version
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Raiford Guins
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2008-12-31 - Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

"According to Guins, these new "control technologies" are designed to embody an ethos of neoliberal governance - through the very media that have been previously presumed to warrant management, legislation, and policing. Repositioned within a discourse of empowerment, security, and choice, the action of regulation, he reveals, has been relocated
The Culture of Urban Control
Language: en
Pages: 218
Authors: John P. Walsh
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013-06-27 - Publisher: Lexington Books

Through an analysis of a federal consent decree and media representation related to overcrowding within the largest single-site jail facility in the United States, the incarceration binge of the 1990’s is explored at the local level in The Culture of Urban Control: Jail Overcrowding in the Crime Control Era. Analysis