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The Cambridge Introduction to Mikhail Bakhtin

Author: Ken Hirschkop

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781107109049

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 250

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A concise, readable and up-to-date introduction to Bakhtin, which provides students with an accessible but sophisticated guide to his work.
The Cambridge Introduction to Mikhail Bakhtin
Language: en
Pages: 250
Authors: Ken Hirschkop
Categories: Literary Collections
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-31 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A concise, readable and up-to-date introduction to Bakhtin, which provides students with an accessible but sophisticated guide to his work.
The Cambridge Companion to the Novel
Language: en
Pages: 316
Authors: Eric Bulson
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-06-30 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

This Companion focuses on the novel as a global genre and examines its role, impact and development.
The Cambridge Companion to Modern Russian Culture
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Nicholas Rzhevsky
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1999-02-25 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Russia is a dominant force in the world, whose culture has been shaped by its unique position on the margins of both East and West. As Russia faces new cultural challenges from outside its national boundaries, this volume introduces Russian culture in all its rich diversity, including the historical conditions
The Cambridge Introduction to Postmodern Fiction
Language: en
Pages: 220
Authors: Bran Nicol
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2009-10-08 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

A lucid exploration of the key features of postmodernism and the most important authors from Beckett to DeLillo.
The Cambridge Companion to Roman Satire
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Kirk Freudenburg
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2005-05-12 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Satire as a distinct genre of writing was first developed by the Romans in the second century BCE. Regarded by them as uniquely 'their own', satire held a special place in the Roman imagination as the one genre that could address the problems of city life from the perspective of