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Religion and Commodification

Author: Vineeta Sinha

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 9781136908248

Category: Religion

Page: 242

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Sustaining a Hindu universe at an everyday life level requires an extraordinary range of religious specialists and ritual paraphernalia. At the level of practice, devotional Hinduism is an embodied religion and grounded in a materiality, that makes the presence of specific physical objects (which when used in worship also carry immense ritual and symbolic load) an indispensable part of its religious practices. Traditionally, both services and objects required for worship were provided and produced by occupational communities. The almost sacred connection between caste groups and occupation/profession has been clearly severed in many diasporic locations, but importantly in India itself. As such, skills and expertise required for producing an array of physical objects in order to support Hindu worship have been taken over by clusters of individuals with no traditional, historical connection with caste-related knowledge. Both the transference and disconnect just noted have been crucial for the ultimate commodification of objects used in the act of Hindu worship, and the emergence of an analogous commercial industry as a result. These developments condense highly complex processes that need careful conceptual explication, a task that is exciting and carries enormous potential for theoretical reflections in key fields of study. Using the lens of ‘visuality’ and ‘materiality,’ Sinha offers insights into the everyday material religious lives of Hindus as they strive to sustain theistic, devotional Hinduism in diasporic locations--particularly Singapore, Malaysia, and Tamilnadu--where religious objects have become commodified.
Religion and Commodification
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Vineeta Sinha
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-04-13 - Publisher: Routledge

Sustaining a Hindu universe at an everyday life level requires an extraordinary range of religious specialists and ritual paraphernalia. At the level of practice, devotional Hinduism is an embodied religion and grounded in a materiality, that makes the presence of specific physical objects (which when used in worship also carry
Religious Commodifications in Asia
Language: en
Pages: 274
Authors: Pattana Kitiarsa
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-11-09 - Publisher: Routledge

This book addresses the growing academic concerns of the market-religion convergences in Asia. Bringing together a group of leading scholars from Asia, Europe, Australia and North America, it discusses multiple issues regarding religious commodifications and their consequences across Asia’s diverse religious traditions. Covering key issues in the anthropology and sociology
The New Blackwell Companion to the Sociology of Religion
Language: en
Pages: 712
Authors: Bryan S. Turner
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-10-03 - Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

Reflecting the very latest developments in the field, the New Companion provides a comprehensive introduction to the sociology of religion with a clear emphasis on comparative and historical approaches. Covers major debates in secularization theory, rational choice theory, feminism and the body Takes a multidisciplinary approach, covering history, sociology, anthropology,
Religion and Commodification
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Vineeta Sinha
Categories: Religion
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-04-13 - Publisher: Routledge

Sustaining a Hindu universe at an everyday life level requires an extraordinary range of religious specialists and ritual paraphernalia. At the level of practice, devotional Hinduism is an embodied religion and grounded in a materiality, that makes the presence of specific physical objects (which when used in worship also carry
Thailand's International Meditation Centers
Language: en
Pages: 198
Authors: Brooke Schedneck
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-05-15 - Publisher: Routledge

This book explores contemporary practices within the new institution of international meditation centers in Thailand. It discusses the development of the lay vipassana meditation movement in Thailand and relates Thai Buddhism to contemporary processes of commodification and globalisation. Through an examination of how meditation centers are promoted internationally, the author