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Human Scale Revisited

Author: Kirkpatrick Sale

Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

ISBN: 9781603587129

Category: ARCHITECTURE

Page: 408

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Big government, big business, big everything: Kirkpatrick Sale took giantism to task in his 1980 classic, Human Scale, and today takes a new look at how the crises that imperil modern America are the inevitable result of bigness grown out of control--and what can be done about it. The result is a keenly updated, carefully argued case for bringing human endeavors back to scales we can comprehend and manage--whether in our built environments, our politics, our business endeavors, our energy plans, or our mobility. Sale walks readers back through history to a time when buildings were scaled to the human figure (as was the Parthenon), democracies were scaled to the societies they served, and enterprise was scaled to communities. Against that backdrop, he dissects the bigger-is-better paradigm that has defined modern times and brought civilization to a crisis point. Says Sale, retreating from our calamity will take rebalancing our relationship to the environment; adopting more human-scale technologies; right-sizing our buildings, communities, and cities; and bringing our critical services--from energy, food, and garbage collection to transportation, health, and education--back to human scale as well. Like Small is Beautiful by E. F. Schumacher, Human Scale has long been a classic of modern decentralist thought and communitarian values--a key tool in the kit of those trying to localize, create meaningful governance in bioregions, or rethink our reverence of and dependence on growth, financially and otherwise. Rewritten to interpret the past few decades, Human Scale offers compelling new insights on how to turn away from the giantism that has caused escalating ecological distress and inequality, dysfunctional governments, and unending warfare and shines a light on many possible pathways that could allow us to scale down, survive, and thrive.
Human Scale Revisited
Language: en
Pages: 408
Authors: Kirkpatrick Sale
Categories: ARCHITECTURE
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017 - Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

Big government, big business, big everything: Kirkpatrick Sale took giantism to task in his 1980 classic, Human Scale, and today takes a new look at how the crises that imperil modern America are the inevitable result of bigness grown out of control--and what can be done about it. The result
The Collapse of 2020
Language: en
Pages: 57
Authors: Kirkpatrick Sale
Categories: Political Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-01-30 - Publisher: Outskirts Press

In this short, powerful, and thoroughly documented book Kirkpatrick Sale, who has been on the cutting edge of American social commentary for fifty years, makes a compelling case for the dangers that this world faces now and the real possibility of the imminent collapse of civilization as we know it.
Farming for the Long Haul
Language: en
Pages: 272
Authors: Michael Foley
Categories: Technology & Engineering
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-02-01 - Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

It’s all but certain that the next fifty years will bring enormous, not to say cataclysmic, disruptions to our present way of life. World oil reserves will be exhausted within that time frame, as will the lithium that powers today’s most sophisticated batteries, suggesting that transportation is equally imperiled. And
Population and Politics
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: John Gerring, Wouter Veenendaal
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-05-28 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Analyzes scale effects across a range of political dimensions, encompassing different political levels using a multi-method approach.
Walking on Lava
Language: en
Pages: 288
Authors: The Dark Mountain Project
Categories: LITERARY COLLECTIONS
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017 - Publisher: Chelsea Green Publishing

The Dark Mountain Project began with a manifesto published in 2009 by two English writers--Dougald Hine and Paul Kingsnorth--who felt that literature was not responding honestly to the crises of our time. In a world in which the climate is being altered by human activities; in which global ecosystems are